2021 Wisconsin Honey Bee Supplier list

Picture of package of bees
How To Install Package Bees in a Langstroth Hive - Beverly Bees

https://browncountybeekeepers.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/Bees-purchasing-2021-2.pdf

For reference, enclosed is the BCBA 2021 Wisconsin Honey Bee supplier guide. Please be sure to contact suppliers for updated information on their bees. Most suppliers will have a designated pick-up date/time that is yet TBD, and could be complicated due to COVID. This list is for reference only and not a recommendation.

If you know of local Wisconsin suppliers NOT on this list, please contact anyone on the BCBA leadership team and we will add them (THANK YOU).

Introduction to Beekeeping – Basics For Someone New to Bees

The Brown County Beekeeping Association is happy to present INTRODUCTION TO BEEKEEPING again this year.Learn the essentials of beginning beekeeping !! As with all things COVID, the 2021 class will be a different than previous years. There are two virtual classes (2 hours each) and one in-person, at-the-hive two hour class.

When:
January 9th, 2021 — 9:00am to 11:00pm (virtual via Zoom)
February 13th, 2021 — 9:00am to 11:00am (virtual via Zoom)
and May 29th, 2021 (at the hive, location TBD)
Online Registration:     Click here
How Much: $40 for an individual, $30 for additional family members
What: An understanding of: Continue reading

Preparing for Winter

At the September club meeting, which was held both in person (socially distanced) and virtually, Richard Schneider from Capital Bee Supply was our remote guest speaker. He did an excellent job presenting the steps beekeepers can take to get ready for our Wisconsin winters. Capital Bee Supply is a Wisconsin based company out of Columbus, WI. The YouTube presentation is presented below. It is 57 minutes in length.

If you would like to see these presentations live or in person you should consider joining the club.

Bees and Bears

A club member sent us pictures of his hives encounter with a bear. He found frames in various places around yard. He was able to put the hive back together and hopes the queen made it. Here is his quote: “Had to hunt down a few pieces in the brush.  Found the spot where the bear laid down to suck up his spoils.    Probably at least ¾ of the honey is still there, just some grass and dead bugs on it.  Which means he’ll likely be back for more.  I’m hoping the bees gave him enough incentive to stay away, which is probably why he didn’t destroy everything in sight.”

Bears knocked the hive off its stand. Luckily the propolis held the boxes together or maybe the bear got scared off before tearing into the boxes.
The hive was strapped down and the bear was still able to knock it off the stand.
The bear carried some of the equipment into the woods. Fortunately most of the equipment was not damaged.
The hive put back together with most of the bees intact. An electric fence is the next step.

Entrance Reducers

The officers of the club have received several questions from new beekeepers about removal of entrance reducers. They put the entrance reducers on when they installed their new bees, as they were instructed. Now they want to know when to remove them. Click here from more information.

Mite Management

At the May 2020 meeting of the club April Kustov, Wisconsin State Apiary Inspector joined our meeting via Zoom to present Mite Management. The video is over an hour long but is very comprehensive about mite management and treatments.

In the video April refers to different mite treatments and the Wisconsin recommended treatments. Here is the sheet to which she refers. If you would like the Power Point presentation click here. You will need Power Point to view the slides.

UPDATED 5/8/2020: Guide to PURCHASING Honey Bees in Wisconsin

Image result for honeybees nyc

Here is the link for the UPDATED BCBA 2020 GUIDE TO PURCHASING BEES 2020. We are not endorsing any specific supplier, but giving members the option to see what’s available, do personal research and make educated decisions. This is the start to a GREAT year, please remember to come to club meetings for additional support and valuable information.

 

 

BCBA Educational posters now available

BCBA now has educational posters available for club events or programs. These posters cover important topics such as whats in the bee hive, bee anatomy, how honey is made and the life cycle of bees. Other posters available cover basic pollinators and seeds and endangered pollinators. These posters will make it fun and easy for us as we explain the importance of bees and bee biology.

Baggie Feeding

During one of the club’s virtual meetings about installing and feeding nucs and packages the question came up about feeding using a zip top bag. No one in the meeting had any feedback so Carl Fisher has done some internet research and come up with the following.

  • A very cost effective way to feed the bees. No extra equipment to buy except for zip top bags and a sharp knife but you probably already have those.
  • Most folks use a gallon zip top freezer bag. Don’t see any reason a quart size wouldn’t work.
  • Mix sugar water just like you would for other types of feeders. One part water to one part sugar (or 2 x 2).
  • Fill the bag half way with the sugar solution.
  • Gently lay the bag directly on top of the frames taking care not to smash your bees.
  • Use a sharp knife to slice several one inch slits in the bag so the bees have access to the mixture. Don’t press too hard when cutting or you will have a sugary mess.
  • Place a spacer on the hive.
  • Replace the inner and outer covers.