Tilt the Hive Forward to Assess Colonie Health

A quick assessment of overall hive health before a full inspection can be done by tilting the hive forward on the bottom board. In this way you get a feel for the weight of the hive, colonie size, and a critical look at the bottom board. Read the full article by Bee Informed Partnership here

More Mite Information

Since Varroa mites were introduced into the United States in 1987 beekeepers have been searching for ways to eliminate them. The more one knows about mites the easier it is for the beekeeper to keep healthy hives. This article in Entomology Today talks about different controls one can use when following an Integrated Pest Management approach.

Learning Opportunity – Wausau WI

The Marathon County Beekeepers Association is presenting a full day of speakers in Wausau WI on the campus of North Central Technical College. Registration is now open. Cost is $49 until February 29, 2020 and then it is $59. NOTE: If you are over 62 years of age the cost is only $21.90. The discount is given at checkout. For more information or to register.

Last year 6 BCBA club members carpooled to Wausau. There are already 3 folks from BCBA have signed up and are planning to carpool again. If you would like to carpool contact the club P president, Dave Elsen.

Guide to WISCONSIN HONEY BEE BREEDERS ASSOCIATION QUEEN BREEDERS LIST

Image result for honey bee queens

Here is a link to Wisconsin Honey Bee QUEEN BREEDERS for those who want to purchase QUEENS from specific and local Queen Breeders. 2020 will be a GREAT year for BCBA with focused EDUCATION to help keep our bees alive and well.

Honey Bee Jobs

Within a hive there are three types of bees. The queen, drones, and worker bees. There is only one queen in a hive, is female, and lays eggs to produce more bees. About 15% of the hive population are drone bees which are male and their only job is to mate with a different queen. Finally about 85% of the bees are female worker bees and they do all of the work around the hive. They take care of the brood, clean and defend the hive, and gather pollen and nectar.

Hive Location

There are numerous factors to consider when determining where to place your hive(s) which include they physical location, bee needs, and human needs. A good starting point is to do an internet search to determine if your local community has set guidelines for maintaining hives. Allouez Wisconsin, for one, has a number of rules to be followed.

Location

  • South facing is optimal – early morning wake-up to start foraging
  • Shade in the PM – so the hive doesn’t overheat in summer
  • Access to water – needed to make honey
  • Good air ventilation – so the hive doesn’t get damp
  • Wind block – can be man-made or natural to help hive survive the winter

Bee Needs

  • No obstruction in front of hive – bees like to exit and fly up
  • Slight lean to the front – so rainwater can drain out
  • Pollen and Nectar Sources – for honey production
  • Level side to side – bees don’t care but could hurt honey production

Human Needs

  • Accessible by vehicle or cart – honey and equipment are heavy
  • Permission – check local ordinances and neighbors
  • Accessible from the back of hive – best to work from the back of hive
  • Weeds and Mowing – keep the hive weed free and trimmed