Category Archives: BCBA

Endangered Pollinators

Earth Day 2021-How to help

As we celebrate Earth Day 2021 the Brown County Beekeepers want to give everyone an idea of the importance of honey bees and pollinators and some suggestions on how everyone can help.

This short message from our President, Dave Elsen, is informative and full of suggestions.

2021 Wisconsin Honey Bee Supplier list

Picture of package of bees
How To Install Package Bees in a Langstroth Hive - Beverly Bees

https://browncountybeekeepers.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Bees-purchasing-2021.pdf

For reference, enclosed is the BCBA 2021 Wisconsin Honey Bee supplier guide. Please be sure to contact suppliers for updated information on their bees. Most suppliers will have a designated pick-up date/time that is yet TBD, and could be complicated due to COVID. This list is for reference only and not a recommendation.

If you know of local Wisconsin suppliers NOT on this list, please contact anyone on the BCBA leadership team and we will add them (THANK YOU).

Preparing for Winter

At the September club meeting, which was held both in person (socially distanced) and virtually, Richard Schneider from Capital Bee Supply was our remote guest speaker. He did an excellent job presenting the steps beekeepers can take to get ready for our Wisconsin winters. Capital Bee Supply is a Wisconsin based company out of Columbus, WI. The YouTube presentation is presented below. It is 57 minutes in length.

If you would like to see these presentations live or in person you should consider joining the club.

Bees and Bears

A club member sent us pictures of his hives encounter with a bear. He found frames in various places around yard. He was able to put the hive back together and hopes the queen made it. Here is his quote: “Had to hunt down a few pieces in the brush.  Found the spot where the bear laid down to suck up his spoils.    Probably at least ¾ of the honey is still there, just some grass and dead bugs on it.  Which means he’ll likely be back for more.  I’m hoping the bees gave him enough incentive to stay away, which is probably why he didn’t destroy everything in sight.”

Bears knocked the hive off its stand. Luckily the propolis held the boxes together or maybe the bear got scared off before tearing into the boxes.
The hive was strapped down and the bear was still able to knock it off the stand.
The bear carried some of the equipment into the woods. Fortunately most of the equipment was not damaged.
The hive put back together with most of the bees intact. An electric fence is the next step.

Entrance Reducers

The officers of the club have received several questions from new beekeepers about removal of entrance reducers. They put the entrance reducers on when they installed their new bees, as they were instructed. Now they want to know when to remove them. Click here from more information.